Sesquicentennial of Brooklin (1997)

(Excerpt from 4 SEPTEMBRE 1997 ASSEMBLÉE LÉGISLATIVE DE L_ONTARIO http://hansardindex.ontla.on.ca/hansardeissue/36-1/l224.htm at about 1:30 pm)

Mr John O’Toole (Durham East): On September 6, 1997, the village of Brooklin, located in my riding of Durham East, will celebrate the 150th anniversary of its naming.

The village, located north of Whitby on Highway 12, was founded in 1840 and was previously named Winchester. When residents of the village went to apply for a post office, they discovered there was already a Winchester post office elsewhere in Ontario. On August 11, 1847, the 300 inhabitants of the village met and agreed to change the name to Brooklin. No one is certain why they chose that name, but perhaps it’s because of the little brook that trickles through the town.

Throughout the day on September 6, several events have been scheduled to commemorate the heritage of this village, with horse-drawn carriages, entertainment and self-guided tours. Visitors to Brooklin can see some of the historic buildings, such as the old Brooklin Mill, which today houses a hardware store and small engine repair shop, and a former stable currently being used by the W.J. Medland and Son Ltd business.

Like so many Ontario villages, Brooklin is no exception in its contribution to this wonderful province of Ontario. At one time, Brooklin was known as being the smallest town in the world to have a senior A lacrosse team. In 1968 the Redmen senior A lacrosse team won the esteemed Mann Cup, and again in 1969, and the team went on to win the cup again in 1985, 1987, 1988 and 1990. The Mann Cup: Morley Kells would like to forget about this.

Recognition should also be given to community leaders such as Dr John McKinney and John Dryden.

I would like to ask the members of the Legislature to join me in congratulating the residents of Brooklin on their 150th celebration.

About the Cows

Posted by Charlton
September 4, 2013
Our-Lucky-Stars-Cows

These wonderful cow paintings have become a huge part of the cafe culture. Trevor spotted them outside Pot Of Gold Antiques on Old Wooler Road which is where we’d bought some chairs and little vintage dessert plates. Mary Postar, the proprietor of the shop didn’t know much about the cow paintings other than that they were salvaged from a barn somewhere around Oshawa. Friends urged me to take a pass on my original intent to have rotating art exhibitions and buy these big beauties for the cafe instead. So, the day before opening they were delivered, and yes, they were perfect.

They’ve been very popular and real conversation starters. Within a few days of opening, a local farmer approached me and said that he believed they could be from a farm in Brooklin, Ontario that he believed was demolished to make way for a new subdivision and the 407 highway. Since then several customers have recognized the paintings and indeed its been confirmed that they were originally hung on the barn exterior of Roybrook Farms in Brooklin, owned by renowned Holstein breeder Roy Ormiston . Indeed the first gent to shed some light on their provenance brought me a copy of ‘The Chosen Breed’ which holds plenty of information on Roy Ormiston and his cows including his legendary ‘white cow’.

Another local farmer has told me he thinks he knows who painted these wonderful beasts and I’m hoping he’ll return with the artist’s name so we can give credit where due! ( My dad would like to have brass plaques made and mounted on the ‘frames’ of each painting, giving names to the cows, to their home and to the artist!)

Now, one final thing – the bull on the right has horns which seems okay, but so does the cow on the left and people are asking if that’s ‘correct’. So, I’m wondering – can you tell this city girl!? And I’d also welcome any more information on the story of these paintings and their subjects! Use the email link on the left to contact me or go to our facebook page and share your comments!